Fyter Fest Thrills, SmackDown Shines | Takes, Takes & More Takes #22

Well folks, it’s been awhile. Four months ago, this series abruptly ended after what I thought was a decent little existence. Simply put, I couldn’t keep watching the wrestling at that rate, and that may be the case moving forward. If so, this’ll be a short-lived comeback but with fans returning, it feels like a good time to start fresh. NXT, AEW and SmackDown are the focus today so with that in mind, let’s get this show on the road, quite literally.

NXT

Since the rehiring of Samoa Joe, I’ve made my own return to NXT. No longer losing a wrestling ratings war, NXT’s move to Tuesday has been a positive step critically, even if a lateral move commercially. I do agree with the consensus though, that this is a good show that’s already benefitting from standing alone each week. At times, I still struggle with an overarching emotional investment but there’s barely a babyface in sight, so that feels inevitable regardless of their new night.

Either way, I can always embrace a wrestling match to start a wrestling show and NXT delivered that here, giving Dakota Kai and Ember Moon some time to set the tone. I feel like I’ve seen this match a lot but Kai and Moon are honestly two of my personal favorite television workers right now. That may sound hyperbolic but I really do think the world of both, just incredibly watchable and able to produce sound matches of this length without exhausting me.

Now without Shotzi Blackheart, Moon’s safety net is gone and admittedly, I do fear for her. To me, she’s a prime candidate for the classic NXT heel turn and I’m just not sure that’s what this brand needs. Then again, perhaps it’ll be more feasible when/if Kai and NXT Champion Raquel Gonzalez split. Ideally, Kai chases Gonzalez as a babyface but whatever form or fashion they choose, that programme feels inevitable after Dakota’s win here. Moon will always be valuable, I just hope that creative has her back.

Speaking of Gonzalez, she’s now set for at least a mini-programme with Xia Li because again, babyfaces, who needs them? The match sounds like an interesting case study at least, a real look at what those two obviously talented women can do without a clear leader involved. I’m intrigued, even if from a more analytical perspective than anything tangible. The women’s division is in transition right now, losing three names last week and apparently gaining Mandy Rose in return. Frankly, I’m very much for this as a trend.

Some talent just gets stagnant on the main roster and stylistically, RAW and SmackDown are too similar to make a shift matter. NXT feels like a genuine clean slate though, especially for Rose, who never really had a proper run on the brand. Rose is someone that clearly, they want to use but it’s just never really worked in my opinion. The raw ingredients are there but not quite to the extent necessary, she’s not incompetent by any means, just lacking a standout skill-set based her main roster usage at least.

Elsewhere, a logical direction was taken with the NXT North American Title, as Legado del Fantasma headed in Hit Row’s direction. This makes sense on numbers alone but again, I have questions. Are we doing an actual babyface turn for Hit Row here, because that’s what should probably happen. Look, ‘Swerve’ is a wonderful villain but this is a money act, just embrace it and try to get something over. The shades of grey stuff remains my biggest issue with this product, though I’m admittedly excited for that eventual match.

The NXT Breakout Tournament got underway also, as Duke Hudson defeated Ikemen Jiro in a pretty short affair. Personally, I wouldn’t have started this tournament with a virtual showcase match, but that’s a bigger picture thing. Am happy for Duke Hudson regardless, who was over a year removed from the ring. Then Brendan Vink, Hudson was a brief RAW regular, teaming with Shane Thorne under the tutelage of MVP. With a big frame, Hudson jumps off the page, armed with a unique charisma too.

Hudson can talk and has a palpable confidence, but it’s not traditional wrestler stuff. He’s almost dry, bringing a different delivery and no, I don’t just mean his accent, which also rules. Simply put, he was an intriguing signing, an intriguing add to RAW and now, an intriguing piece of this tournament. I doubt he’ll win it, but this victory alone suggests that there’s some sort of plan, which bodes well if nothing else. I do worry about these ‘prospects’ though, as the main event scene seems so set in place.

Speaking of such, Adam Cole still isn’t going anywhere and indeed, remains completely miscast as a heel. I know, I know, it’s annoying and you want me to move on but seriously, know your viewer. The NXT audience loves Adam Cole and after such a sustained stint as top heel, that may as well be embraced. Cole still stands out on this roster and for all his faults, that’d probably be the case in any promotion, on any brand. Build around him as the lead protagonist I say, at least that’s fresh.

Finally, Karrion Kross retained in the main event, vanquishing genuine contender Johnny Gargano. A title change seemed possible here but in the end, Gargano was a mere afterthought, as Kross left Joe laying to close the show. I actually liked the match though, able to produce an engaging title tilt without having to fill half an hour along the way. That helped Gargano as much as Kross, simplifying things and getting right to business. It was a very simple match really, with Gargano playing the de facto babyface.

Though it’s a distant memory now, few are better at that, fighting from underneath and sprinkling hope spots throughout. The Kross saga fascinates me, as he’s not even uh, bad? I mean, he’s not particularly good I guess but like, he’s mechanically fine, just kind of flat. That’s whatever, but he’s now been framed on-screen as a bell to bell disaster and with this audience, that’s hard to shake. I feel for him really, as this level of skill can be worked with, it’s not Kross’ fault that he’s immediately won the title, twice!

Nonetheless, Samoa Joe is seemingly next up for him and that’s exciting news, I think. I mean, I’m excited anyway, very excited in fact. To me, a return to NXT signaled the likely end of Joe’s in-ring career but this angle suggests otherwise. I think that Joe has been used rather well thus far but as a wrestler, his value is obviously multiplied. Now, another title reign? I’m less sure. Joe is wonderful, an all-timer but he’s been NXT Champion and going backwards will seldom lead anything forward.

I’ll watch either way, of course, as Joe is king but you get my point. It’s time for a new era in NXT or at the very least, fresh ideas for familiar faces. Joe is Joe, he’s an attraction certainly but a centerpiece in 2021? Probably not the best placement. I enjoyed NXT though, it’s consistently good and slowly but surely, they’re earning my attention.

AEW

For over a year, AEW was operating without its special ingredient. That was easy to forget at times, especially as Dynamite went from strength-to-strength but after two weeks on the road, it’s impossible to imagine a product without these crowds. Across the country, wrestling fans are just desperate for this release, infinitely more invested than they even were before the promotion’s ‘pandemic era.’ The roster is stronger, the matches are neater, the promos are better, and the result is great television. This week in particular, those factors produced an all-time episode of Dynamite.

As all shows should, it started with Wild Thing and somehow retained that pace, just two hours of nothing but hits. Moxley’s opener with Karl Anderson shouldn’t be ignored though, an engaging TV bout reminiscent of Anderson’s many G1 undercard bouts. Moxley is just special, bringing a raw energy to this show that’s not possible with anyone else. The entrance is just icing on the cake really, the final touch to one of wrestling’s great thrills. Next week, Moxley’s got Lance Archer in a Texas Death Match too, so he’s certainly making up for lost time.

Speaking of such, Ricky Starks is back, and he still feels as certain for stardom as ever. He and Brian Cage produced an exciting bout that in opting against a surprise, actually surprised me. The story throughout has been that Cage is distancing himself from Team Taz and indeed, they finished the job for him, helping Starks and switching ‘The Machine’ babyface. This feud aside, I don’t really know about Cage’s usefulness in that role, especially as a singles. Perhaps Jake can bring him and Archer together, as the latter’s own direction feels in doubt after Wednesday.

Starks staying heel is interesting, as I did feel that for the sake of balance, he could be used on the other side. As a cocky, but charming babyface, Starks felt like a natural fit opposite MJF or Ethan Page, but this route definitely helps Team Taz. This way, the faction maintains its variety and Powerhouse Hobbs can now fully fill the position of group monster. Elsewhere, Cody Rhodes is back apparently, as reliant on fans as we all recalled. This feud with Malakai Black is off to an encouraging start, just a matter of keeping things simple.

AEW has my trust in that sense too, with ‘Hangman’ Page’s pursuit of Kenny Omega continuing to set the standard for modern wrestling storytelling. This is one of the industry’s great arcs, and the emotional weight of Dark Order’s involvement is truly staggering. That act isn’t just in this story, they are its heart and soul, bringing the fans to life with their support of ‘Hangman.’ The audience is just ready for this, they are ready for Page as champion and when that match arrives, the big fight feel should be striking.

This show always seemed set to deliver, but Christian’s renewed rivalry with Matt Hardy was a common critique. That’s fair enough but in reality, they just had a good wrestling match, one that the audience thoroughly enjoyed. It’s amazing what happens when two pros are protected enough and then left to their own devices, truly shocking stuff. Once again though, this show may have been a home run, but it was still light on development for the women’s division. Yuka Sakazaki vs. Penelope Ford was enjoyable enough, but Britt Baker remains the focus.

At least this week, that resulted in something good, as Baker cut a simple in-ring promo that breathed life into this feud. I’ve long thought that at times, fans are slightly hyperbolic with Baker’s ability on the microphone but no doubt, this one fit the bill. Baker spoke with great conviction and the content was good also, just a strong short segment to steady the ship after a few rough weeks. Even still, I’d like to see a secondary women’s feud in some form or fashion as without that, this thing can only climb so high.

Finally, Darby Allin and Ethan Page provided the perfect conclusion to their violent conflict. Some dynamics just work, and this is one of them, two rising stars simply made for each other. Allin’s passion for bumping like a wild man brings something seemingly psychotic out of Page, adding an edge to his ‘All Ego’ persona. Page is a player, and this feud should be just the start, but I must say, it’ll be hard to make him look as dangerous as Allin has as of late. It’s something special, a feud that could and should be revisited through the years.

After this, Allin’s next step should be interesting, as history suggests that he and Sting have to find another pair to fight at All Out. Personally, I almost expected a student vs. teacher direction but Allin’s victory here makes that even more unlikely, so I guess we’ll see. Either way, this was an all-time outing for AEW, one of the greatest editions of Dynamite yet. Next week looks strong too, even if not quite to this level but special names aside, this just feels like a new norm really, simply extreme examples.

This roster is such that the quality should be consistently high, especially with their almost rotational approach to wrestling television. Simply put, enjoy the ride folks, it rules.

SmackDown

After over a year without live crowds, the blue brand was back in front of fans this week. The first step of WWE’s long-awaited return to touring, SmackDown was a triumphant occasion, also concluding the build to Money in the Bank. As expected based on the advertisements alone, it was a good show but with this energy? It felt like much more than that. After a hilariously understated welcoming by Vince McMahon, an onslaught of entrances occurred, preparing to open the show with a blockbuster 6-man tag.

This ten minutes or so stole the show in truth, and I don’t even mean that as a criticism of the rest. The whole thing was truly epic, a collection of ‘moments’ that after everything, felt truly earned. Reigns was out first, setting the tone for an electricity that peaked with Edge, entering to an unfathomable reaction. For all the talk of fickle crowds swaying opinion, Edge was a case of the opposite, suffering from the ThunderDome’s silence. Regardless of creative, this guy was always getting cheered, whining or not.

Edge probably shouldn’t beat Roman, like ever but his overness is such that I’m no longer dismissing it. Unnecessary? Yes. Short-sighted? Probably but a complete misstep? No, the audience suggests otherwise. Either way, this was a very good 6-man tag, with Rey and Dom Mysterio taking Edge’s side opposite The Bloodline. Mysterio continues to connect with Jimmy and Jey as perfectly as you’d expect, and that tag title tilt is a potential show-stealer on Sunday, even on the pre-show. This was about Reigns and Edge though, with the latter eventually standing tall.

That particular degree of momentum just wasn’t being sustained in this show’s current state, but it had a segment left in it yet. As was widely hinted at beforehand, Finn Balor is back on the ‘main roster,’ returning to SmackDown and silencing Sami Zayn. Obviously, Balor is a wonderful talent and on the babyface side, the rich get richer. Reigns has always had interesting opponents available and Balor may now top that list, especially with their history. That’s been a magical pairing before, so I can only imagine its potential now.

Also, for all the criticisms of NXT’s most recent form, Balor is a credit to it. That brand allowed Balor to refresh his persona, reminding the world of his ability and rejuvenating his own brand in the process. That should be far more common than it is, even if Balor is an extreme example, considering his skill and popularity. WWE has the structure to utilize a global territory system and yet, their desperation to keep everyone on the red and blue brands result in mass overexposure. Keep things fluid, it’s best for all involved.

Inevitably, things did dip some from there, transitioning to another tag match between the champions and the team of Shotzi and Nox. As far as I know, Natalya and Tamina lost this exact match last week so heading into Money in the Bank, a match they’re inexplicably in, a repeat felt puzzling. I do understand the urge to feature the NXT call-ups in front of live crowds though, as this particular audience seemed mostly uninitiated. Unfortunately, even in victory, Shotzi and Nox were an afterthought. The whole match was really, with Liv Morgan and Zelina Vega on commentary.

On the bright side, Morgan’s reaction was very encouraging and though it’s nothing new, they certainly have something with her. Morgan connects and is genuinely likeable, now earning the more cynical viewer’s respect over the years too. People like Liv, and quite naturally root for her which silly as it sounds, is increasingly rare in this division. I don’t think that Morgan needs to win on Sunday as that doesn’t seem like the story to tell here but based on the current line-up, I’m struggling to see a stronger alternative.

Frankly, I don’t think the actual winner is even booked yet. I personally expect either Doudrop to take out Alexa Bliss, or Sonya Deville to replace Liv Morgan. In the former scenario, a Becky Lynch return feels in play but then again, perhaps it’s just these eight. Don’t get me wrong, that’s not a talentless group, far from it. Unfortunately though, it is an uninteresting line-up as sadly, most of the performers involved are simply positioned poorly on weekly TV. If it stays as is, Morgan jumps off the page as an ideal victor.

Whoever wins, they aren’t likely to dethrone Bianca Belair anytime soon. Receiving an absolute superstar reaction, Belair felt like a face of the company level figure, just exuding charisma. Belair gets better every time I see her but credit to Carmella, the challenger in this replacement matchup. For the longest time, I had gripes with Carmella’s in-ring efforts but this year, she appears to have really smoothed out those rough edges. Her bump and feed here was better than ever, showing actual aggression when the time come too.

Together, Belair and Carmella combined for a strong title match, convincing me that a proper programme is worthwhile. Sasha Banks is the obvious choice for SummerSlam though, which will probably take shape next week. Before I move to the main event, it’s worth mentioning Baron Corbin, who was absolutely tremendous here. This shtick is awful silly but I was thoroughly entertained, securing this as Corbin’s peak in my mind, even though I’ve only seen one segment. I like Corbin too, but this was actually good in a way that fleeting multi-man matches aren’t.

That led us to our aforementioned headliner anyway, as Kevin Owens dropped Corbin before the fatal 4-way main event. It was a showcase of SmackDown’s Money in the Bank participants, ultimately meaningless but an exciting sprint nonetheless. Rollins eventually won, which I hope erases him from the shortlist of actual contenders. Look, I’m not going to dance around this situation as it’s simple, Big E should win this match. In fact, Big E should also beat Bobby Lashley at SummerSlam. I’m tired of waiting, it’s been a year now, get on with this before it’s too late.

Regardless, this was a strong show, packed with excitement and feel-good fun. That sounds goofy, but it’s true, the audience was happy and WWE didn’t actively upset them. Three good matches and nothing that offended me, that’s a great night at the office, especially under these circumstances. I will say though, the ThunderDome crowd noise making momentary returns is very bad for my brain, as it results in me fearfully watching the fans, still hiding my many scars from those horrifying screens.

Oh well, very good show, seriously.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s